• 4/22/2019

The best form of marketing is through word of mouth. Let your customers share their experiences on your page and highlight customers who you’ve done business with recently. Also, encourage them to review your business page. Positive reviews are displayed prominently on your page, helping you build trust with potential customers.

Caravella Demolition added the Reviews feature to their page and has racked up dozens of positive ratings.

“People see the type of company we are, what we do and how we do it. I’ve had certain people call and say they don’t care what the price is, they just want us there,” says Caravella. “If there’s somebody on Facebook that knows me and needs a demolition job, I’m 99.999% getting that call.”

From bootstrap beginnings that evolved from bare-handed sorting in 2004 to heavy equipment by 2011, the recycling enterprise recycles a wide assortment of construction and renovation debris. It boasts a staff of more than 100 employees and a fleet of 26 Doosan wheel loaders and crawler excavators and has added two more locations in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and New Castle, Delaware.

“We want to lead in recycling,” Jon says. “We see major problems for the planet, and we want to be on the cutting edge, solving this problem. I would like to think we grew based on survival of the fittest, hard work and business savvy.”

Tackling diverse materials

Diverting waste from sanitary landfills is more than a noble environmental cause; it’s a profitable mission. The company handles more than 1,000 tons of material daily. Roughly 50 percent of the material is recycled, 25 percent is screenings or fines, and 25 percent goes to a sanitary landfill.

“At a vast majority of American construction sites, all of that material goes right to the landfill,” Jon says.

Tackling diverse materials

Diverting waste from sanitary landfills is more than a noble environmental cause; it’s a profitable mission. The company handles more than 1,000 tons of material daily. Roughly 50 percent of the material is recycled, 25 percent is screenings or fines, and 25 percent goes to a sanitary landfill.

“At a vast majority of American construction sites, all of that material goes right to the landfill,” Jon says.

Diverting waste from sanitary landfills is more than a noble environmental cause; it’s a profitable mission. The company handles more than 1,000 tons of material daily. Roughly 50 percent of the material is recycled, 25 percent is screenings or fines, and 25 percent goes to a sanitary landfill.

“At a vast majority of American construction sites, all of that material goes right to the landfill,” Jon says.

Waste not, want not

Revolution Recovery provides maximum recycling and repurposing of materials, including wood, pallets, drywall cutoffs, metals, concrete, brick, asphalt, cardboard and plastic. Customers can rent roll-off containers from the company that, once filled, Revolution Recovery delivers to the recycling site for sorting and recycling processes.

Jon points out that machine versatility is key when processing diverse materials.

“The machines are pretty powerful, and we’re able to load and dig if we need to,” Jon says. “I actually just rented a hydraulic breaker attachment for one of the excavators to break concrete.”

Operators use the company’s wheel loaders to transport material; feed the fine screens; and load wood chips, crushed concrete and material to be baled.

“Most of the materials we can bale – like the cardboard, the plastic, the vinyl – and we can sell them,” says Nick, who oversees the day-to-day operations. “The non-ferrous metals we actually grade on-site, and a lot of those get baled as well. We crush the concrete and then sell the material.”

Shingles also get crushed and sold, wood gets turned into mulch or a bedding product, and drywall segments are transformed into soil amendment.